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Mentor Spotlight: Moe Bachouti, Career advice for Class of 2018

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Jun 18, 2018
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Blogs

Moe Bachouti   As the class of 2018 put on their caps and gowns to receive their diploma, they start an exciting new chapter in their lives. For many of them, this marks the end of their formal education and the start of their continuous lifelong learning. Moe Bachouti from Cambridge College speaks about how his constant thirst to learn from different people throughout his life has shaped him to become the person he is today. Below is a transcript of our conversation, it is lightly edited...

Expert Interview: Min Zhan & the Effect of Loans on Low-Income Students

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May 17, 2018
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Blogs

Joel had the opportunity to speak with Min Zhan, a professor at the University of Illinois. Her research focuses on the economic mobility of low-income families. Zhan finds that the human capital development provided by higher education can improve the economic standing of low-income students. However, low-income students usually take out large amounts of student loans, which can have negative effects on their financial wellbeing. In the following interview, Zhan discusses the impact of higher...

What Do Higher Interest Rates Mean For Your Student Loans?

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May 15, 2018
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Blogs

Once a year, the federal government sets the annual interest rate on federal student loans. This rate effectively determines how expensive it is for students to borrow money from the government for their education. Although this interest rate has been increasing in recent years, Congress has set a ceiling of 8.25% on these loans. While the Department of Education hasn’t formally set interest rates on student loans yet, this year’s rates are expected to increase. Last year,...

The Need for More Student Loan Research

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May 14, 2018
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Blogs

With nearly five million borrowers in default on their student loans, it is clear that the policies surrounding educational finance need improvement. When student debt levels increase, it has major effects on the overall economy. If policies don’t change, the student loan crisis has the potential to negatively impact the economy in years to come. In recent years, proposals for student loan policy have been based primarily on preconceived notions and assumptions. In order to make informed...

UCLA Professors Discuss the Cost of Higher Education

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May 10, 2018
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Blogs

The cost of a college education is becoming more and more expensive. A recent report by the College Board states that going to a private four-year institution costs $34,740 a year. In 1988, this number was $15,160 (adjusted for inflation). As rising costs threaten college accessibility, the US government has implemented large-scale initiatives to help students pay for college. One such initiative is the PLUS loan program. There are approximately 4.5 million students with loans from the PLUS...

Expert Interview: William Mann & Education Financing

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May 10, 2018
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Blogs

I recently spoke with William Mann, a finance professor at UCLA doing research on how corporations find capital to run their businesses. He has recently taken an interest in student loans as it draws a natural analogy with how households find money to make purchases (such as a college education). In the following conversation, William gives profound insight into his research and the higher education market as a whole. I also had a conversation with William’s co-author, Mahyar Kargar Tell...

Expert Interview: Mahyar Kargar & Household Finance

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May 10, 2018
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Blogs

I spoke with Mahyar Kargar, a finance professor and Ph.D. candidate at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management. Mahyar’s key area of interest in his research revolves around household finance. I managed to get in touch with him to talk about his work and insight in household finance. Could you tell me a bit about yourself? I am in my final year as a Ph.D. candidate at UCLA in Finance. One of the research areas I am interested in is household finance. This project was based on a conversation...

Constantine Yannelis & the State of Student Loans

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May 03, 2018
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Blogs

In 2010, student loan debt had surpassed credit card debt – taking second place behind mortgage debt, totaling at $825 billion. Fast forward eight years and this number have almost doubled to $1.5 trillion. To make things worse, five million Americans defaulting on student loans. The average student graduating in the class of 2017 owes $39,400 – what is more concerning is the number of people taking on substantial student loans ($50,000 or more). In 1992, only 2% of people who have...

Mentor Spotlight: Soumen Ganguly and TMT Consulting

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May 02, 2018
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Blogs

Today’s Mentor Spotlight focuses on Soumen Ganguly, a Director at Altman Vilandrie & Company with a specialty in telecom/media/tech consulting. Sabrina had the chance to sit down with Soumen and learn more about his path into the industry, as well as the lessons he’s learned along the way.   Sabrina: Can you give me a quick introduction of yourself? Soumen: I’m a Director at Altman Vilandrie & Company which is a strategy consulting firm focused on telecom/media/tech....

Interview: Sabrina Manville is making research on paying for college a breeze

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Apr 30, 2018
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Blogs

Going to college is a big step in anyone’s life. A college education provides upward social mobility as well as an opportunity to create meaningful contributions to society. While it is clear that the value of a college education is far more than a high school degree, many people don’t fully grasp the gravity of paying for college. In addition to that, there is no real transparent way for students to find out exactly how much they will be spending without applying....

Rising Outstanding Student Debt

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Apr 23, 2018
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Blogs

During the 2008 housing crisis, a minority of borrowers were responsible for the majority of the country’s outstanding mortgage debt. Now, the same patterns are happening with student debt: students with over $50,000 in loans make up more than half of the country’s outstanding student debt. Which students are taking out the most loans? In many cases, it’s graduate school students. In theory, these borrowers have higher earning potential and are more likely to pay back their...

Boot Camps Help Graduates Get Jobs Without the Debt

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Apr 19, 2018
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Blogs

For many, a degree from an accredited university represents the promise of a successful career. But as more college graduates find themselves in major debt without any career prospects, some students are turning to a different type of institution: boot camps. Most boot camps, like MissionU and Praxis, focus on coding and connect students with internships in tech. Although graduates of these programs lack a name-brand degree, they tend to make up for it with reduced debt and high-paying jobs...

Parents' Student Loans Hurt Their Children

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Apr 17, 2018
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Blogs

As student loan debt increases, it is becoming a generational problem. The average graduate with a bachelor’s degree takes 21 years to pay off their student loans. For graduates starting their families shortly after graduation, this often means they are paying back their own debt throughout their children’s’ lives. In a recent survey, 20% of students say their parents are still paying back their own student loans. In a survey of Generation Z students, more than half expect...

Seven Steps to Finding a Mentor

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Apr 13, 2018
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Blogs

The benefits of mentorship are endless: personal development, greater career success, and even higher earning potential. But finding a mentor can be difficult. Here are seven steps to finding a mentor and building a relationship that will last: 1. Find people who inspire you Finding a mentor with values, beliefs, and characteristics you admire is more important than finding one with your dream job at your dream company. While your career goals may change, your character will stay with you...

Protecting the Rights of Student Loan Borrowers

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Apr 12, 2018
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Blogs

Protecting student loan borrowers may not seem like a polarizing issue, but it has caused conflict between federal and state governments in recent months. In response to the lack of federal protections for student loan borrowers, many states have put their own systems in place. However, there has been pushback from the federal government, since many government officials believe that states do not have the right to regulate student loan providers. The latest to pass a bill protecting borrowers?...

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